Clearing snow and ice – is it dangerous?

Of course it is – you might slip over. However, if you are prepared to take that risk and do it sensibly you shouldn’t be deterred from being helping your community by a fear of being sued. There is simple guidance from the government.  If it is your property you may have a liability if you don’t clear it.

The Institution of Occupational Safety and Health, the largest health and safety membership organisation in the world says, “As a general rule it’s sensible for firms to consider the risks and take reasonable steps to prevent accidents from happening. If this means gritting outside the boundaries of your workplace, then it’s better to do that than to have people slipping over or involved in car crashes on your doorstep.”

If you want to assess the risk it’s always worth knowing your enemy. After the 2009 snows a firm of Claimant Personal Injury Solicitors doing the dreaded ‘No Win No Fee’ claims put out a leaflet about snow and ice claims which described the possibility of any claims against people clearing the highway voluntarily as an “urban myth”.

In legal terms there is a theoretical basis for a claim in Negligence, but it would only be sustainable is you created a new risk. Following the government guidance should ensure you don’t. Even if you did the Compensation Act 2006 says that a court may have regard to whether “imposing an obligation to take steps might prevent an activity which is desirable from taking place (either at all, to a particular extent, or in a particular way), or might discourage persons” from activities that were positive. Clearing snow and ice is exactly the kind of activity that is aimed at.

In Frome the Town Council has taken a pro-active approach and has a Snow Patrol.

This post is provides information not legal advice on any particular situation on which you should act.

Contact Neil Howlett or Andy Hambleton